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Fall 2022 Library Service Updates

A Hope More Powerful Than the Sea: Immigration

Overview of immigration from the OCC Libraries

Immigration is the act of settling in a new country after leaving one’s country of citizenship. For example, a person born in China who travels to the United States to live is an immigrant to the United States. Immigration implies permanency; in many cases, immigrants go on to become citizens of the receiving nation. Tourists and others who visit a place temporarily are not considered immigrants

Read more from the OCC Libraries' Opposing Viewpoints database.

Data from the American Immigration Center

7% of Michiganders are Latino or Asian—and they vote​

Michigan has the highest proportion of Arab Americans in the nation, and they contribute to the state’s economy

Immigrant, Latino, and Asian entrepreneurs and consumers add billions of dollars and tens of thousands of jobs to Michigan’s economy

Immigrants are essential to Michigan’s economy as workers and taxpayers

Unauthorized immigrants pay taxes

Immigrants are integral to Michigan’s economy as students

Immigrants excel educationally

Read the full report (PDF):

Immigrants and the military

Statistics on Immigrant Service Members on Active Duty

  • Approximately 65,000 immigrants serve in the armed forces.
  • More than two-thirds of the foreign born serving in the armed forces are naturalized citizens.
  • The foreign born represent approximately 5 percent of all active-duty personnel.

Citizenship and the Armed Forces

  • A July 2002 executive order made noncitizen members of the armed forces eligible for expedited U.S. citizenship.
  • More than 37,250 immigrant service members have become U.S. citizens since September 2001.
  • USCIS has granted posthumous citizenship to 111 military personnel killed in the line of duty since September 2001.
  • The 2004 policy changes have allowed USCIS to hold naturalization ceremonies at U.S. military bases around the world.

Read more: http://www.migrationpolicy.org/article/immigrants-us-armed-forces/

Becoming a Citizen

OCC library books

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